Have you ever considered the range of sounds that nature produces?  

Recently, I stumbled across an incredible resource, the Nature Soundmap.   A team of more than 90 professional sound recordists from around the world have collaborated to combine high-quality field recordings with the latest satellite imagery for this project.  Each recording is made with two microphones to capture a 360 degrees auditory representation, just like if you were standing there.  The results are incredible.  Pick a location, read the notes and let the sounds carry you away.

Check it out here:  https://www.naturesoundmap.com

Nature soundscapes can also be used to augment reporting and stories, as in the podcasts of ecologist, educator, and TV host, Chris Morgan.  

Each of Morgan’s episodes is a true adventure. With his producer, Matt Martin, they capture the sounds of nature in a way that makes listeners feel like they are somehow present.   There is an intimacy that is created that I haven’t heard replicated on other nature-focused podcasts. Their work needs to be heard. 

Here is one example that demonstrates the power of sound:

https://www.kuow.org/stories/the-quietest-place-in-the-world-is-right-here-in-washington-state

You can also access this by downloading The Wild by Chris Morgan from your favorite podcast hosting service.  

Stay tuned tomorrow for a review of Earth’s Wild Music: Celebrating and Defending the Songs by Kathleen Dean Moore.

@MorganWildlife   @matt_martin507   @wildambience

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